An ESET-commissioned survey sheds light on the browsing habits of Australians and how they protect themselves online

The post Cyberawareness in Australia: The good and the bad appeared first on WeLiveSecurity

The company will also soon launch anti-fingerprinting measures aimed at detecting and mitigating covert tracking and workarounds

The post Google to end support for third‑party cookies in Chrome appeared first on WeLiveSecurity



Phishing—when an online attacker tries to trick you into giving them your username and password—is one of the most common causes of account compromises. We recently partnered with The Harris Poll to survey 500 high-risk users (politicians and their staff, journalists, business executives, activists, online influencers) living in the U.S. Seventy-four percent of them reported having been the target of a phishing attempt or compromised by a phishing attack.

Gmail automatically blocks more than 100 million phishing emails every day and warns people that are targeted by government-backed attackers, but you can further strengthen the security of your Google Account by enrolling in the Advanced Protection Program—our strongest security protections that automatically help defend against evolving methods attackers use to gain access to your personal and work Google Accounts and data.

Security keys are an important feature of the Advanced Protection Program, because they provide the strongest protection against phishing attacks. In the past, you had to separately purchase and carry physical security keys. Last year, we built security keys into Android phones—and starting today, you can activate a security key on your iPhone to help protect your Google Account.

Activating the security key on your iPhone with Google’s Smart Lock app

Security keys use public-key cryptography to verify your identity and URL of the login page, so that an attacker can’t access your account even if they have your username or password. Unlike other two-factor authentication (2FA) methods that try to verify your sign-in, security keys are built with FIDO standards that provide the strongest protection against automated bots, bulk phishing attacks, and targeted phishing attacks. You can learn more about security keys from our Cloud Next ‘19 presentation.

Approving the sign-in to a Google Account with Google’s SmartLock app on an iPhone

On your iPhone, the security key can be activated with Google’s Smart Lock app; on your Android phone, the functionality is built in. The security key in your phone uses Bluetooth to verify your sign-in on Chrome OS, iOS, macOS and Windows 10 devices without requiring you to pair your devices. This helps protect your Google Account on virtually any device with the convenience of your phone.

How to get started

Follow these simple steps to help protect your personal or work Google Account today:

  • Activate your phone’s security key (Android 7+ or iOS 10+)
  • Enroll in the Advanced Protection Program
  • When signing in to your Google Account, make sure Bluetooth is turned on on your phone and the device you’re signing in on.

We also highly recommend registering a backup security key to your account and keeping it in a safe place, so you can get into your account if you lose your phone. You can get a security key from a number of vendors, including Google, with our own Titan Security Key.

If you’re a Google Cloud customer, you can find out more about the Advanced Protection Program for the enterprise on our G Suite Updates blog.

Here’s to stronger account security—right in your pocket.



Phishing—when an online attacker tries to trick you into giving them your username and password—is one of the most common causes of account compromises. We recently partnered with The Harris Poll to survey 500 high-risk users (politicians and their staff, journalists, business executives, activists, online influencers) living in the U.S. Seventy-four percent of them reported having been the target of a phishing attempt or compromised by a phishing attack.

Gmail automatically blocks more than 100 million phishing emails every day and warns people that are targeted by government-backed attackers, but you can further strengthen the security of your Google Account by enrolling in the Advanced Protection Program—our strongest security protections that automatically help defend against evolving methods attackers use to gain access to your personal and work Google Accounts and data.

Security keys are an important feature of the Advanced Protection Program, because they provide the strongest protection against phishing attacks. In the past, you had to separately purchase and carry physical security keys. Last year, we built security keys into Android phones—and starting today, you can activate a security key on your iPhone to help protect your Google Account.

Activating the security key on your iPhone with Google’s Smart Lock app

Security keys use public-key cryptography to verify your identity and URL of the login page, so that an attacker can’t access your account even if they have your username or password. Unlike other two-factor authentication (2FA) methods that try to verify your sign-in, security keys are built with FIDO standards that provide the strongest protection against automated bots, bulk phishing attacks, and targeted phishing attacks. You can learn more about security keys from our Cloud Next ‘19 presentation.

Approving the sign-in to a Google Account with Google’s SmartLock app on an iPhone

On your iPhone, the security key can be activated with Google’s Smart Lock app; on your Android phone, the functionality is built in. The security key in your phone uses Bluetooth to verify your sign-in on Chrome OS, iOS, macOS and Windows 10 devices without requiring you to pair your devices. This helps protect your Google Account on virtually any device with the convenience of your phone.

How to get started

Follow these simple steps to help protect your personal or work Google Account today:

  • Activate your phone’s security key (Android 7+ or iOS 10+)
  • Enroll in the Advanced Protection Program
  • When signing in to your Google Account, make sure Bluetooth is turned on on your phone and the device you’re signing in on.

We also highly recommend registering a backup security key to your account and keeping it in a safe place, so you can get into your account if you lose your phone. You can get a security key from a number of vendors, including Google, with our own Titan Security Key.

If you’re a Google Cloud customer, you can find out more about the Advanced Protection Program for the enterprise on our G Suite Updates blog.

Here’s to stronger account security—right in your pocket.

The US intelligence agency expects attackers to waste no time in developing tools aimed at exploiting the vulnerability

The post Microsoft patches severe Windows flaw after tip‑off from NSA appeared first on WeLiveSecurity

The US intelligence agency expects attackers to waste no time in developing tools aimed at exploiting the vulnerability

The post Microsoft patches severe Windows flaw after tip‑off from NSA appeared first on WeLiveSecurity

At Google, we care deeply about the security of open-source projects, as they’re such a critical part of our infrastructure—and indeed everyone’s. Today, the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) announced a new bug bounty program for Kubernetes that we helped create and get up and running. Here’s a brief overview of the program, other ways we help secure open-source projects and information on how you can get involved.

Launching the Kubernetes bug bounty program

Kubernetes is a CNCF project. As part of its graduation criteria, the CNCF recently funded the project’s first security audit, to review its core areas and identify potential issues. The audit identified and addressed several previously unknown security issues. Thankfully, Kubernetes already had a Product Security Committee, including engineers from the Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) security team, who respond to and patch any newly discovered bugs. But the job of securing an open-source project is never done. To increase awareness of Kubernetes’ security model, attract new security researchers, and reward ongoing efforts in the community, the Kubernetes Product Security Committee began discussions in 2018 about launching an official bug bounty program.

Find Kubernetes bugs, get paid

What kind of bugs does the bounty program recognize? Most of the content you’d think of as ‘core’ Kubernetes, included at https://github.com/kubernetes, is in scope. We’re interested in common kinds of security issues like remote code execution, privilege escalation, and bugs in authentication or authorization. Because Kubernetes is a community project, we’re also interested in the Kubernetes supply chain, including build and release processes that might allow a malicious individual to gain unauthorized access to commits, or otherwise affect build artifacts. This is a bit different from your standard bug bounty as there isn’t a ‘live’ environment for you to test—Kubernetes can be configured in many different ways, and we’re looking for bugs that affect any of those (except when existing configuration options could mitigate the bug). Thanks to the CNCF’s ongoing support and funding of this new program, depending on the bug, you can be rewarded with a bounty anywhere from $100 to $10,000.

The bug bounty program has been in a private release for several months, with invited researchers submitting bugs and to help us test the triage process. And today, the new Kubernetes bug bounty program is live! We’re excited to see what kind of bugs you discover, and are ready to respond to new reports. You can learn more about the program and how to get involved here.

Dedicated to Kubernetes security

Google has been involved in this new Kubernetes bug bounty from the get-go: proposing the program, completing vendor evaluations, defining the initial scope, testing the process, and onboarding HackerOne to implement the bug bounty solution. Though this is a big effort, it’s part of our ongoing commitment to securing Kubernetes. Google continues to be involved in every part of Kubernetes security, including responding to vulnerabilities as part of the Kubernetes Product Security Committee, chairing the sig-auth Kubernetes special interest group, and leading the aforementioned Kubernetes security audit. We realize that security is a critical part of any user’s decision to use an open-source tool, so we dedicate resources to help ensure we’re providing the best possible security for Kubernetes and GKE.

Although the Kubernetes bug bounty program is new, it isn’t a novel strategy for Google. We have enjoyed a close relationship with the security research community for many years and, in 2010, Google established our own Vulnerability Rewards Program (VRP). The VRP provides rewards for vulnerabilities reported in GKE and virtually all other Google Cloud services. (If you find a bug in GKE that isn’t specific to Kubernetes core, you should still report it to the Google VRP!) Nor is Kubernetes the only open-source project with a bug bounty program. In fact, we recently expanded our Patch Rewards program to provide financial rewards both upfront and after-the-fact for security improvements to open-source projects.

Help keep the world’s infrastructure safe. Report a bug to the Kubernetes bug bounty, or a GKE bug to the Google VRP.

At Google, we care deeply about the security of open-source projects, as they’re such a critical part of our infrastructure—and indeed everyone’s. Today, the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) announced a new bug bounty program for Kubernetes that we helped create and get up and running. Here’s a brief overview of the program, other ways we help secure open-source projects and information on how you can get involved.

Launching the Kubernetes bug bounty program

Kubernetes is a CNCF project. As part of its graduation criteria, the CNCF recently funded the project’s first security audit, to review its core areas and identify potential issues. The audit identified and addressed several previously unknown security issues. Thankfully, Kubernetes already had a Product Security Committee, including engineers from the Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) security team, who respond to and patch any newly discovered bugs. But the job of securing an open-source project is never done. To increase awareness of Kubernetes’ security model, attract new security researchers, and reward ongoing efforts in the community, the Kubernetes Product Security Committee began discussions in 2018 about launching an official bug bounty program.

Find Kubernetes bugs, get paid

What kind of bugs does the bounty program recognize? Most of the content you’d think of as ‘core’ Kubernetes, included at https://github.com/kubernetes, is in scope. We’re interested in common kinds of security issues like remote code execution, privilege escalation, and bugs in authentication or authorization. Because Kubernetes is a community project, we’re also interested in the Kubernetes supply chain, including build and release processes that might allow a malicious individual to gain unauthorized access to commits, or otherwise affect build artifacts. This is a bit different from your standard bug bounty as there isn’t a ‘live’ environment for you to test—Kubernetes can be configured in many different ways, and we’re looking for bugs that affect any of those (except when existing configuration options could mitigate the bug). Thanks to the CNCF’s ongoing support and funding of this new program, depending on the bug, you can be rewarded with a bounty anywhere from $100 to $10,000.

The bug bounty program has been in a private release for several months, with invited researchers submitting bugs and to help us test the triage process. And today, the new Kubernetes bug bounty program is live! We’re excited to see what kind of bugs you discover, and are ready to respond to new reports. You can learn more about the program and how to get involved here.

Dedicated to Kubernetes security

Google has been involved in this new Kubernetes bug bounty from the get-go: proposing the program, completing vendor evaluations, defining the initial scope, testing the process, and onboarding HackerOne to implement the bug bounty solution. Though this is a big effort, it’s part of our ongoing commitment to securing Kubernetes. Google continues to be involved in every part of Kubernetes security, including responding to vulnerabilities as part of the Kubernetes Product Security Committee, chairing the sig-auth Kubernetes special interest group, and leading the aforementioned Kubernetes security audit. We realize that security is a critical part of any user’s decision to use an open-source tool, so we dedicate resources to help ensure we’re providing the best possible security for Kubernetes and GKE.

Although the Kubernetes bug bounty program is new, it isn’t a novel strategy for Google. We have enjoyed a close relationship with the security research community for many years and, in 2010, Google established our own Vulnerability Rewards Program (VRP). The VRP provides rewards for vulnerabilities reported in GKE and virtually all other Google Cloud services. (If you find a bug in GKE that isn’t specific to Kubernetes core, you should still report it to the Google VRP!) Nor is Kubernetes the only open-source project with a bug bounty program. In fact, we recently expanded our Patch Rewards program to provide financial rewards both upfront and after-the-fact for security improvements to open-source projects.

Help keep the world’s infrastructure safe. Report a bug to the Kubernetes bug bounty, or a GKE bug to the Google VRP.

At Google, we care deeply about the security of open-source projects, as they’re such a critical part of our infrastructure—and indeed everyone’s. Today, the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) announced a new bug bounty program for Kubernetes that we helped create and get up and running. Here’s a brief overview of the program, other ways we help secure open-source projects and information on how you can get involved.

Launching the Kubernetes bug bounty program

Kubernetes is a CNCF project. As part of its graduation criteria, the CNCF recently funded the project’s first security audit, to review its core areas and identify potential issues. The audit identified and addressed several previously unknown security issues. Thankfully, Kubernetes already had a Product Security Committee, including engineers from the Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) security team, who respond to and patch any newly discovered bugs. But the job of securing an open-source project is never done. To increase awareness of Kubernetes’ security model, attract new security researchers, and reward ongoing efforts in the community, the Kubernetes Product Security Committee began discussions in 2018 about launching an official bug bounty program.

Find Kubernetes bugs, get paid

What kind of bugs does the bounty program recognize? Most of the content you’d think of as ‘core’ Kubernetes, included at https://github.com/kubernetes, is in scope. We’re interested in common kinds of security issues like remote code execution, privilege escalation, and bugs in authentication or authorization. Because Kubernetes is a community project, we’re also interested in the Kubernetes supply chain, including build and release processes that might allow a malicious individual to gain unauthorized access to commits, or otherwise affect build artifacts. This is a bit different from your standard bug bounty as there isn’t a ‘live’ environment for you to test—Kubernetes can be configured in many different ways, and we’re looking for bugs that affect any of those (except when existing configuration options could mitigate the bug). Thanks to the CNCF’s ongoing support and funding of this new program, depending on the bug, you can be rewarded with a bounty anywhere from $100 to $10,000.

The bug bounty program has been in a private release for several months, with invited researchers submitting bugs and to help us test the triage process. And today, the new Kubernetes bug bounty program is live! We’re excited to see what kind of bugs you discover, and are ready to respond to new reports. You can learn more about the program and how to get involved here.

Dedicated to Kubernetes security

Google has been involved in this new Kubernetes bug bounty from the get-go: proposing the program, completing vendor evaluations, defining the initial scope, testing the process, and onboarding HackerOne to implement the bug bounty solution. Though this is a big effort, it’s part of our ongoing commitment to securing Kubernetes. Google continues to be involved in every part of Kubernetes security, including responding to vulnerabilities as part of the Kubernetes Product Security Committee, chairing the sig-auth Kubernetes special interest group, and leading the aforementioned Kubernetes security audit. We realize that security is a critical part of any user’s decision to use an open-source tool, so we dedicate resources to help ensure we’re providing the best possible security for Kubernetes and GKE.

Although the Kubernetes bug bounty program is new, it isn’t a novel strategy for Google. We have enjoyed a close relationship with the security research community for many years and, in 2010, Google established our own Vulnerability Rewards Program (VRP). The VRP provides rewards for vulnerabilities reported in GKE and virtually all other Google Cloud services. (If you find a bug in GKE that isn’t specific to Kubernetes core, you should still report it to the Google VRP!) Nor is Kubernetes the only open-source project with a bug bounty program. In fact, we recently expanded our Patch Rewards program to provide financial rewards both upfront and after-the-fact for security improvements to open-source projects.

Help keep the world’s infrastructure safe. Report a bug to the Kubernetes bug bounty, or a GKE bug to the Google VRP.

Multiple cable modem models from various manufacturers found vulnerable to takeover attacks

The post Millions of modems at risk of remote hijacking appeared first on WeLiveSecurity